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What are peoples favorite poems about London  rumpty  16 Mar 15 12:21PM Thread Closed

Could the readers tell me their favourite  London poems ?  Shared appreciation  goes a long way

re: What are peoples favorite poems about London  unknown  16 Mar 15 12:51PM Thread Closed

the one about the bridge falling down

re: What are peoples favorite poems about London  unknown  16 Mar 15 12:51PM Thread Closed

or the Black Death one

re: What are peoples favorite poems about London  unknown  16 Mar 15 8:28PM Thread Closed

III. THE FIRE SERMON

176. V. Spenser, Prothalamion.

192. Cf. The Tempest, I. ii.

196. Cf. Marvell, To His Coy Mistress.

197. Cf. Day, Parliament of Bees:
When of the sudden, listening, you shall hear,
A noise of horns and hunting, which shall bring
Actaeon to Diana in the spring,
Where all shall see her naked skin...

199. I do not know the origin of the ballad from which these lines are taken: it was reported to me from Sydney, Australia.

202. And oh, the sound of children, singing in the cupola!
V. Verlaine, Parsifal.

210. The currants were quoted at a price 'carriage and insurance free to London'; and the Bill of Lading, etc., were to be handed to the buyer upon payment of the sight draft.

218. Tiresias, although a mere spectator and not indeed a 'character', is yet the most important personage in the poem, uniting all the rest. Just as the one-eyed merchant, seller of currants, melts into the Phoenician Sailor, and the latter is not wholly distinct from Ferdinand Prince of Naples, so all the women are one woman, and the two sexes meet in Tiresias. What Tiresias sees, in fact, is the substance of the poem. The whole passage from Ovid is of great anthropological interest:

Translate...Cum Iunone iocos et 'maior vestra profecto est
Quam, quae contingit maribus', dixisse, 'voluptas.'
Illa negat; placuit quae sit sententia docti
Quaerere Tiresiae: venus huic erat utraque nota.
Nam duo magnorum viridi coeuntia silva
Corpora serpentum baculi violaverat ictu
Deque viro factus, mirabile, femina septem
Egerat autumnos; octavo rursus eosdem
Vidit et 'est vestrae si tanta potentia plagae',
Dixit 'ut auctoris sortem in contraria mutet,
Nunc quoque vos feriam!' percussis anguibus isdem
Forma prior rediit genetivaque venit imago.
Arbiter hic igitur sumptus de lite iocosa
Dicta Iovis firmat; gravius Saturnia iusto
Nec pro materia fertur doluisse suique
Iudicis aeterna damnavit lumina nocte,
At pater omnipotens (neque enim licet inrita cuiquam
Facta dei fecisse deo) pro lumine adempto
Scire futura dedit poenamque levavit honore.

. . . Jove, they say, was happy
And feeling pretty good (with wine) forgetting
Anxiety and care, and killing time
Joking with Juno. "I maintain," he told her
"You females get more pleasure out of loving
Than we poor males do, ever." She denied it,
So they decided to refer the question
To wise Tiresias’ judgment: he should know
What love was like, from either point of view.
Once he had come upon two serpents mating
In the green woods, and struck them from each other,
And thereupon, from man was turned into woman,
And was a woman seven years, and saw
The serpents once again, and once more struck them
Apart, remarking: "If there is such magic
In giving you blows, that man is turned into woman,
It may be that woman is turned to man. Worth trying."
And so he was a man again; as umpire,
He took the side of Jove. And Juno
Was a bad loser, and she said that umpires
Were always blind, and made him so forever.
No god can over-rule another’s action,
But the Almighty Father, out of pity,
In compensation, gave Tiresias power
To know the future, so there was some honor
Along with punishment.

Ovid, Metamorphoses (translated by Rolphe Humphries): The Story of Tiresias, Book III, Lines 318 -343

221. This may not appear as exact as Sappho's lines, but I had in mind the 'longshore' or 'dory' fisherman, who returns at nightfall.

253. V. Goldsmith, the song in The Vicar of Wakefield.

257. V. The Tempest, as above.

264. The interior of St. Magnus Martyr is to my mind one of the finest among Wren's interiors. See The Proposed Demolition of Nineteen City Churches (P. S. King & Son, Ltd.).

266. The Song of the (three) Thames-daughters begins here. From line 292 to 306 inclusive they speak in turn. V. Götterdammerung, III. i: The Rhine-daughters.

279. V. Froude, Elizabeth, vol. I, ch. iv, letter of De Quadra to Philip of Spain:
In the afternoon we were in a barge, watching the games on the river. (The queen) was alone with Lord Robert and myself on the poop, when they began to talk nonsense, and went so far that Lord Robert at last said, as I was on the spot there was no reason why they should not be married if the queen pleased.

293. Cf. Purgatorio, V. 133:
'Ricorditi di me, che son la Pia;
Siena mi fe', disfecemi Maremma.'

301.In October 1921 Eliot was in Margate, recuperating from mental exhaustion.

307. V. St. Augustine's Confessions : 'to Carthage then I came, where a cauldron of unholy loves sang all about mine ears'.

308. The complete text of the Buddha's Fire Sermon (which corresponds in importance to the Sermon on the Mount) from which these words are taken, will be found translated in the late Henry Clarke Warren's Buddhism in Translation (Harvard Oriental Series). Mr. Warren was one of the great pioneers of Buddhist studies in the Occident.
In the sermon, the Buddha instructs his priests that all things "are on fire. . . The eye. . . is on fire; forms are on fire; eye-consciousness is on fire; impressions received by the eye are on fire; and whatever sensation, pleasant, unpleasant, or indifferent, originates in dependence on impressions received by the eye, that also is on fire. And with what are these on fire? With the fire of passion, say I, with the fire of hatred, with the fire of infatuation."

309. From St. Augustine's Confessions again. The collocation of these two representatives of eastern and western asceticism, as the culmination of this part of the poem, is not an accident.

re: What are peoples favorite poems about London  unknown  16 Mar 15 8:28PM Thread Closed

if you're going to copy and paste you may as well do it properly.

re: What are peoples favorite poems about London  unknown  16 Mar 15 8:32PM Thread Closed

Adittapariyaya Sutta [The Buddha's Fire Sermon]

I have heard that on one occasion the Buddha was staying in Gaya, at Gaya Head, with 1,000 fire-worshipping monks. There he addressed the fire worshippers:

“Monks, Everything is ablaze! What All is ablaze? The eye is ablaze. Forms are ablaze. Consciousness at the eye is ablaze. Contact at the eye is ablaze. And whatever there is that arises in dependence on contact at the eye — experienced as pleasure, pain or neither-pleasure-nor-pain — that too is ablaze. Ablaze with what? Ablaze with the fire of passion, the fire of aversion, the fire of delusion. Ablaze, I tell you, with birth, aging & death, with sorrows, lamentations, pains, distresses, & despairs.

“The ear is ablaze. Sounds are ablaze…

“The nose is ablaze. Aromas are ablaze…

“The tongue is ablaze. Flavors are ablaze…

“The body is ablaze. Tactile sensations are ablaze…

“The intellect is ablaze. Ideas are ablaze. Consciousness at the intellect is ablaze. Contact at the intellect is ablaze. And whatever there is that arises in dependence on contact at the intellect — experienced as pleasure, pain or neither-pleasure-nor-pain — that too is ablaze. Ablaze with what? Ablaze with the fire of passion, the fire of aversion, the fire of delusion. Ablaze, I say, with birth, aging & death, with sorrows, lamentations, pains, distresses, & despairs.

“Seeing thus, the experienced seeker grows disenchanted with the eye, disenchanted with forms, disenchanted with consciousness at the eye, disenchanted with contact at the eye. And whatever there is that arises in dependence on contact at the eye, experienced as pleasure, pain or neither-pleasure-nor-pain: With that, too, he grows disenchanted.

“He grows disenchanted with the ear…

“He grows disenchanted with the nose…

“He grows disenchanted with the tongue…

“He grows disenchanted with the body…

“He grows disenchanted with the intellect, disenchanted with ideas, disenchanted with consciousness at the intellect, disenchanted with contact at the intellect. And whatever there is that arises in dependence on contact at the intellect, experienced as pleasure, pain or neither-pleasure-nor-pain: He grows disenchanted with that too. Disenchanted, he becomes dispassionate. Through dispassion, he is fully released. With full release, there is the knowledge, ‘Fully released.’ He discerns that ‘Birth is ended, the holy life fulfilled, the task done. There is nothing further for this world.’”

re: What are peoples favorite poems about London  mr_e  26 Mar 15 2:36PM Thread Closed

Euston station, unsure who wrote the lyrics.. but there is a version of it done in song by the fureys..

Euston station, and I've just missed the train,
All the day girls and beggars, are washed out by the rain,
And the tambourine lady, and the saxophone man,
play a sad song of somewhere to go if you can.

And it's times like this, that I miss kilkenny,
And I'll sing the old song, swear to go home,
But the work and the money make a man play a part,
And in clay and in concrete he can bury his heart.

Through fields and farmyards, where I ran as a lad,
Came the stories of London,and the times to be had.
So I saved all my money, I came as  fast as I could,
And the stories were true ones, and the times they were good.

But now and then, I miss kilkenny,
I'd sing the old songs, and swear to go home,
But the boys from the coalyard, and the "King's Head" nearby
With a wink would say "Come on, Finn!"
and we'll drink some place dry.

Euston station, to the newsboy's harsh cries,
Gypsy girls selling flowers have a glint in their eyes,
As the harried commuters hurry home for the day,
All the songs of the buskers somehow seem to say:

If you long to be somewhere, For Gods sake go while you can,
If you live full of yearning, you're going to die half a man,
And I miss kilkenny, as I'm boarding the train,
And by this time tomorrow I'll be home again.
THE SONG:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k7d3cNPncaY

re: What are peoples favorite poems about London  cassell  31 Mar 15 4:05PM Thread Closed

I thought Wordworth  write a poem about London . Cannot  remember its name but I think one of the images  was about Jerusalem

re: What are peoples favorite poems about London  starr  31 Mar 15 4:11PM Thread Closed

Since I've always thought of song lyrics as poems, I'll go with Kate Bush's "Oh, England, My Lionheart" from 1979.  Pretty sure she mentions London in there.  :-)

re: What are peoples favorite poems about London  unknown  2 Apr 15 3:10PM Thread Closed

It hasn't been written yet.

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