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re: good vs evil, cadmium, good vs evil  cadmium  1 Jun 17 2:19AM Thread Closed

i like to discuss things, and there are a few people here who can talk about concepts. i get the feeling that you don't trust thinking. and, poetry is the invention of thinking -- the first literature. which means, the first attempt to add images together to suggest things happen in 'time', in that cyclical linear space that's not intuitive at all.

re: good vs evil, cadmium, good vs evil  PollyReg  1 Jun 17 2:36AM Thread Closed

Stop with the 'time' business I don't want to have a mutual schizophrenia with you.  I don't understand these whacky concepts of you and Alchemia, (and I apologise for my leukemia spelling earlier...I still remember that sill aleukemia biz. Who the cripies was that person? I don't care, because it wasn't me)...but that's not to say the concepts are not valid...just non understandable to a gymnast.

Go write a poem about something you saw today Cadmium. Something down the street or your cat or something. I understand those ones.

re: good vs evil, cadmium, good vs evil  PollyReg  1 Jun 17 2:45AM Thread Closed

If I wrote a book it would take me 10 years to edit it and by then I'd be insane(r)

Can you just imagine it? 10 years of making sure actions were attached to subjects

Arghhh. I'd sooner thrust a cheese grater up my nose

re: good vs evil, cadmium, good vs evil  cadmium  1 Jun 17 3:12AM Thread Closed

it'd take 10 years to learn to write at all. novels are pretty much baloney. .. all about keeping the reader thrilled. difference between poetry and a novel is that the novelist has to keep asking if what's being written is believable. a poet starts with the believable and finds and demonstrates the connection between belief and action.

and, 'time' is just another word. there is no time, just anticipation and rejection.  

re: good vs evil, cadmium, good vs evil  PollyReg  1 Jun 17 4:44AM Thread Closed

> it'd take 10 years to learn to write at all.

I dunno, I think if I put my mind to it I could churn out mills and boons....you probably could too...(a gay series)

They all have the same storyline, anyway, lol. How hard could it be?


> and, 'time' is just another word. there is no time, just
> anticipation and rejection.  

Don't say that it's too sad and not true.

First one to a gay mills and boon wins  PollyReg  1 Jun 17 4:50AM Thread Closed

Like too too sad!

They make good money those mills and boon novelists.

(You better hurry up with yours in case I finish mine first and influence your posse with it)

;-) Bye, Bye I have to get ready for work.

re: good vs evil, cadmium, good vs evil  cadmium  1 Jun 17 6:47AM Thread Closed

for novel lit, you want to give the illusion that a psychology is being uncovered, that a personality becomes a predisposition and not a choice. that's very hard to do, isn't it alc? where you think at first you know the person and then you read and find you don't trust the narrator after all to have really gotten it right. if you can pull it off, it's both a simulation of life and a simulation of the narrator and the reader working together. robbe-grillet is one of my favorite authors for that reason. there's a clarity and a hypnagogic dillusion weaving in and out like to strands of DNA. jane austen is one of my favorite authors for that reason. her characters are all party'd up and talking the talk, and then she strips them naked by the end of the novel. that's her eroticism... that some finely dressed people really are beautiful after all. the reader has a proper feeling of modesty when reading a novel. the author can strip the reader naked as he reads, and the reader has to decide what to do about it -- what to do about suddenly being naked. henry james is one of my favorite authors for that reason. a fresh young woman in the world must both pass amongst men and gather energy from proximity, or must contain herself as an accumulator, an electric body capable of smiting. how then can the reader avoid reading henry james and not become very uncomfortable, as his own experience with women shows itself as foolish and fatuous and, really, avaricious for the prize. the novel, then, is unique to the novelist and it's easy to write a novel that looks like a novel. but, if you want to create a living text you have to work hard to write as though you were talking to someone in person -- then decide for the novel who that person is: their experience in life and in reading.

re: good vs evil, cadmium, good vs evil  PollyReg  1 Jun 17 10:16PM Thread Closed

I rarely remember authors. I went through a period when I was 18 or so where I decided I was only going to read things suitable to the image I sought to cultivate and in the process educate myself...so I joined the city library and started reading what I thought was 'cool'...f Scott Fitzgerald, Henry Miller...that kind of thing. Everyone is a little bit impressed by the very face of their imagined self at that age, no? After a time I also got stuck into physics books(made me insane), psychology books(made me want to vomit) and eventually medical journals (which was akin to donning a nurses outfit and taking an axe to the neck of my loved ones)...Anyway I spent an unmemorable year just reading...I don't remember many authors though I've read countless books in my life. My mum liked Stephen King and Dean Koontz so I've read a lot of them...I find Stephen King a bit of a rambler sometimes though...My gran liked mysteries so I've read a lot of Ruth Rendell (sp?) and etc. my best friend is a mills and boon devourer so she'd give them to me when she'd finished. So I've read, and maybe jacked off (heh), to a few of them in my time. I like the author that wrote "gone girl" though I can't think of her name...I recently bought and read a short story of hers. And I think my favourite book is The God of Small Things because the prose is beautiful and poetic. I miss books. Ebooks aren't the same.

re: good vs evil, cadmium, good vs evil  cadmium  2 Jun 17 12:47AM Thread Closed

one of the problems with strong literature, even miller, is that it's written by old people who've gone through the world and been through the mill. kids read in those books what they can, but the author's got his or her own problems to work out, and they're not the problems we had when we were kids. the value though is that the books are just written well -- miller tells his story to us -- "you see, it was like this. wasn't that a crapper," and we can follow these stories of exotic places and peoples. but, what the hell did i know in fact about these people and places when i was 16?

by the way, here, it'd help if you'd explain what you mean by 'poetic prose', cause, really, i haven't actually a clue what you yourself mean by that term.

If only we could teeter on bridges  PollyReg  2 Jun 17 5:48AM Thread Closed

In this instance, in that particular book, I mean that the language is so courageous, seductive and original that it very almost renders the content redundant, and yet, somehow it doesn't.

That's an extraordinary feat for any kind of writer.  

She has another book coming out soon. Hopefully it's not disappointing.

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